Christine Schneider
4 min readFeb 9, 2019

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Really: no thank you, Mr. Pecker. Or, how to leave a relationship gracefully.

What if, by the time everyone living in the United States turns 18, he/she/they publishes a personal moral code (on medium, on instagram, on snap, or as an amazon list, by God!), with at least three tenets that will apply to one’s own life going forward? What if this became part of the American way?

What would your three element moral code contain today? Will it change over time? Would you have some of the same elements as your birth family? Would you and your partner share similar moral codes?

No matter how you were brought up or who raised you, some authority figure probably gave you some suggestions of precepts to include in your personal moral code. Perhaps these came from a parent, or from your church, or from a teacher. Many of us are taught from an early age that one’s word is everything. That lying is wrong, and that promises are made to be kept. The idea of ‘personal rules to live by’ is ancient. And whether you live by the Ten Commandments, have borrowed from Churchill’s moral code, or have a moral code that you sketched out yourself as a teenager and modified over time, moral codes might be good for everyone to have — a lighthouse providing guidance when things become foggy, and a way to make our society better overall for many people.

It is worth considering how our country would change if each of us could make and share two or three personal rules to live by, and then actually live by them.

And because each moral code is personal, we can all withhold judgment about decisions other people make, unless those decisions and actions are violative of that person’s own personal moral code. And we can help each other in upholding personal moral codes.

This focus on integrity and morality — whatever that might mean to you individually — also necessarily pulls some focus away from the sensate world of mankind. It’s a reminder that it is not all about making money, buying things, sex, lust, and stimulation. All of those things relate to the body corporeal, which necessarily is as young today as it will ever be, and which will fade and age if we are lucky enough to stay alive long enough. And with our focus away from the sensate world of mankind, the focus shines on the soul, on consciousness, on what might very well continue on for future…

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Christine Schneider

Atlanta, Georgia. Books, cocktails, theatre, art, writing, music, real estate, but not always in that order. Vice Chair of Board of Actor’s Express Theatre.